Book Review: The Exiled

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The Exiled, by Kati Hiekkapelto (translated by David Hackston), is the third book in the Anna Fekete series of crime thrillers (you may read my review of the second, The Defenceless, here). This latest story is set in and around the town of Kanizsa, Serbia, where Anna is taking a much needed holiday with her mother and brother who now live in the area. Anna was born in Kanizsa but finds its customs and expectations invasive having acclimatised herself to life in Finland. She and her family have many friends eager to renew their acquaintance with a young woman they regard as a success. Some grew up with her parents and talk intimately about her late father who she barely remembers. Anna questions where she now considers home.

The story opens with a suicide. It then moves back a couple of weeks to take the reader through events leading up to this death. Anna has only just arrived in town and is attending a local wine festival with her former friends. The convivial atmosphere is shattered when her bag is stolen, the thief using the crowds to assist in his getaway. Anna gives chase but to no avail. Her friends casually blame the gypsies, an assertion that annoys the more broad-minded visitor.

There are tensions in the town due to the growing number of refugees arriving from conflict zones around the world. Along with the Romani they are blamed for rising crime and a faltering economy. When Anna’s bag is recovered, albeit stripped of cash, credit card and passport, a Romani man, found dead, is blamed and the police close the case. Anna is dissatisfied with their investigation and reluctantly decides to check things out herself.

Anna is a brittle yet determined young woman. Her somewhat abrupt manner is mirrored in the prose. It evokes a bleak situation shadowed by corruption and undercurrents of fear. Given the current problems in Europe the agitation felt by many of the characters is prescient.

Anna uncovers a disturbing series of events that suggest respected citizens are routinely breaking the law. There have been miscarriages of justice but, when itinerant people are involved, few seem to care.

The writing remains sharp and focused throughout, flowing deftly as the true darkness of the tale is revealed. Anna is a complex, vulnerable yet strong and admirable protagonist. This was a taut and satisfying read.

My copy of this book was provided gratis by the publisher.

This post is a stop on The Finnish Invasion Blog Tour. Do check out the other blogs taking part, detailed below.

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The Exiled is published by Orenda Books and is available to buy now.

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2 comments on “Book Review: The Exiled

  1. tripfiction says:

    Ace review. Just reading it now….

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