Book Review: Stanly’s Ghost

“That brief, glowing time when an afternoon spent on the lawn with only a cardboard box and a stick for company was an afternoon well spent. That time which, like all times, you didn’t truly appreciate until you realised it had long passed.

But then there’s new times. And you do those.”

Stanly’s Ghost, by Stefan Mohamed, is the third book in the author’s Bitter Sixteen Trilogy. I review the first two books here and here. In this final installment the teenage superhero, Stanly Bird, discovers that he has somehow been released from his suspended dreamstate amongst the shimmers who unleashed monsters into his world. Stanly’s awakening is abrupt and confusing, with images imprinting themselves on his memory that he cannot explain. When he returns to London he finds that time has moved on and much has changed.

Stanly’s old nemesis, Freeman, is running what is now known as Angelcorps, working with governments and heads of state to manage the roles empowered individuals can usefully play in a society still being rebuilt after the Collision. Registration and enhanced surveillance have been widely accepted, for the good of the people (of course). What actually happened, and Stanly’s role in this, have been altered in people’s memories. Alongside the myriad of superpowers now being openly wielded, the most pervasive is mind control. Stanly needs to learn quickly if he is to avoid being manipulated. His powers are particularly strong and Angelcorp will only allow him to operate in the public sphere if Freeman retains control.

Like the previous two installments in this series, the writing is witty and candid with many passing references to popular culture. Unlike his friends, Stanly has not aged so is still eighteen years old. He is impulsive, somewhat arrogant and has little understanding of the organisation he is up against. His powers have grown exponentially and he is determined to use them to help his friends. He harbours a desire to be a force for good in the world, a comic book superhero. His problem lies in deciding what good means.

Into this maelstrom of conflicting emotions and risky exposures appears another powerful individual who also wishes to influence Stanly’s behaviour. The Collision proved that alternative worlds exist and he shows Stanly that it is possible to move between them. Stanly has the power to rid his world of a dangerous megalomaniac but he fears what doing so would make him.

Issues are explored with the lightest of touches whilst following Stanly as he flies around London, throwing large objects whilst reading people’s minds and using the force, or whatever it should be called in this tale. The narrative is funny and quick, poignant and honest in its depiction of a teenager trying to retain some control over his life when most of the time he hasn’t a clue what exactly he wants to do or to be.

After the epic battles and revelations I wondered how the author could create a saisfying denouement. He does so with aplomb. There may be no easy answers to the massive questions, nor to those Stanly struggles with on a personal level, but the final page is a perfect fit with all that has gone before.

An adrenaline inducing adventure that never takes itself too seriously. The writing flows and the action is fist-pumpingly good. A must read for anyone who has ever dreamed of having superpowers. Always fun and entertaining, yet it is the originality and depth that truly impressed me.

My copy of this book was provided gratis by the publisher, Salt.

 

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