The Barbellion Prize – A Roundup

At the end of last month I agreed to help promote the inaugural Barbellion Prize by reviewing its shortlist. I wrote about this here. All I initially knew about the books selected were their titles and the aims of the prize. I trusted that the judges would choose books worth reading – this proved a good call.

This year all shortlisted books were memoirs. It quickly became clear that each was structured differently, reflecting the authors’ skills – including use of language.

Most were beautifully written, a pleasure to read. Experiences were not mined for misery – to garner sympathy – but rather to help raise awareness of issues faced.

Over the past couple of weekends I have posted my thoughts on each book. Below are links to my reviews.

On 12th February, Golem Girl was announced as the winner of the prize. I have no quibbles with the judges’ choice – plus the amazing artwork by the author complemented the text perfectly. My personal favourite was probably Sanatorium, for its lyricism, but the list was so strong there was no disappointment at the outcome.

I was not the only book blogger approached to review the shortlist. If you would like to find out what other readers thought of these titles, check out the following blogs.

My thanks to the Barbellion Prize for arranging with the publishers for me to be sent copies of the four shortlisted books. I feel privileged to have been involved.

The Barbellion Prize

The Barbellion Prize is a book prize dedicated to the furtherance of ill and disabled voices in writing. The prize is awarded annually to an author whose work has best represented the experience of chronic illness and/or disability.

The awarded work can be of any genre in fiction, memoir, biography, poetry, or critical non-fiction from around the world – whether it is in English, in translation, traditionally published, or self-published.

The prize is named in tribute to English diarist W.N.P. Barbellion, who wrote eloquently on his life with multiple sclerosis (MS) before his death in 1919.

 

Earlier this month I was delighted to be contacted by Jake Goldsmith, creator of The Barbellion Prize, asking if I would consider taking this year’s shortlisted books to feature on my blog. I had been following the prize on Twitter and was happy to become involved.

In writing about why he set up the prize, Jake states:

It can take a lot of time and energy to be ill, and many do not have the luxury of being able to write about their lives, or be creative, or even the opportunity of an education in order to do that. And it would surely be better if we could see and celebrate these lives more.

The prize is being judged by

  • Dr Shahd Alshammari – Assistant Professor of Literature, currently teaching in Kuwait
  • Jake Goldsmith – founder and director of The Barbellion Prize
  • Cat Mitchell – Lecturer and Programme Leader of the Writing and Publishing degree at the University of Derby

All are writers who live with chronic illness.

 

The 2020 Longlist

I have only read one of the longlisted books – Saving Lucia – but liked the sound of the four books I was being offered.

I look forward to reading these as they arrive and posting my thoughts.

The winner will be announced on 12 February 2021.

 

To find out more about The Barbellion Prize, you may visit its website: here.

You may also follow them on Twitter: @BarbellionPrize