Book Review: Liminal

“The rhythm of the glen, the rhythm of new life in the language of the old ones.”

Liminal, by Bee Lewis, takes a series of typically modern day problems and plays them out within the backdrop of a timeless and somewhat threatening wilderness. There are surreal elements and sections where the language and imagery are rich to the point of over indulgence. Dream sequences are necessarily mystical and somewhat disturbing. Their intensity requires interpretation that I’m not convinced I achieved.

The day to day sections are written as more standard domestic thriller with just a suggestion of the supernatural. The protagonists are struggling with a frustrating inability to communicate.

The story is told over the course of a week leading up to Easter. Esther and her husband, Dan, have uprooted their comfortable lives in the centre of vibrant Bristol to move to a remote glen in the Highlands of Scotland. They have purchased a long disused railway station which they intend to renovate and turn into a writers’ centre. Cut off from mobile phone signals and internet access, the radical change they have chosen is yet another challenging shift in lives already derailed.

Esther is newly pregnant and determined to make her faltering marriage work for the sake of their child. Her own childhood was difficult, although she now plans to try to build bridges. She regards the move as a fresh start and a way to remove Dan from the influence of his overbearingly religious father. Esther is still grieving two recent and significant losses. Dan is struggling to cope with his enforced change of career. Neither is able to talk to the other about their true feelings. Both are keeping secrets while blaming the other for not sharing.

Arriving at their new home they discover the fridge and cupboards unexpectedly stocked with food. A neighbour, Mike, pops by to introduce himself and explain that this is by way of welcome. When a thick fog settles over the land overnight it becomes too risky to leave the glen. Esther is suffering intense dreams where she is being hunted in the neighbouring forests. As an amputee her mobility is impaired.

The trees and the various creatures observe the new arrivals. Each day is a struggle to contain festering resentments. Esther is aware of her marital issues but tries to suppress their importance. These play out in her dreams which appear to offer both threat and potential for freedom. At times she feels inexplicably attuned to her surroundings but cannot understand what they are trying to tell her. Dan is concerned she is suffering some sort of breakdown.

Over the course of the coming days Mike is a regular visitor. He and Dan are at ease with each other – Esther has never previously seen her husband relax in this way. She is also drawn to Mike but unsure how to behave with him. Esther is unsettled, unable to quash her suspicion that Dan is once again hiding important facts from her. The fog renders them prisoners in a building that harbours its own secrets.

The failing marriage, the cut off setting and the enigmatic stranger are well portrayed. The dream sequences and anthropomorphised nature add to the spooky tension. The plot progression felt somewhat slow at times until the denouement. The reveal had been foreshadowed, but required a sudden character shift.

There were aspects of the story that I wanted to work – interesting ideas and suggestions. The writing conjured the requisite disturbance but ultimately lacked coherence. I wish it were otherwise but this affected my enjoyment. It was not a tale that worked for me.

My copy of this book was provided gratis by the publisher, Salt.

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Book Review: The Other Twin

The Other Twin, by LV Hay, is a thriller set in Brighton about families and the dark secrets they keep from each other and their friends. The protagonist, Poppy, is living in a rundown flat in London when she receives a phone call informing her that her estranged sister, India, is dead. Still reeling from shock, Poppy abandons her chaotic city lifestyle and returns to the family home. Her step-father is trying to hold the threads of their lives together while her mum falls apart. India fell to her death from a nearby bridge, into the path of a moving train. A post on her blog could be a suicide note, but Poppy cannot believe that the sister she once knew well would have chosen to die.

Childhood friends attend the funeral including Matthew, a boyfriend Poppy left behind when she moved away. Matthew’s twin sister, Ana, treats Poppy with disdain. Ana is in a struggling relationship with Jayden, the playboy son of wealthy hotel owners. Their two families are well known in the area, valuing the image they project alongside their reputations.

Poppy determines to find out more about her sister’s death and soon comes across a name on line, Jenny, of whom everyone she asks denies knowledge. Through India’s blog she tracks the girl down but learns only that there is a secret Jenny will not share. She is wary and elusive but had obviously been close to India. Poppy begins to suspect each of her old friends in turn, that they know more about her sister’s death than they are willing to tell.

As Poppy persists in her somewhat haphazard investigations, Matthew and she feel a rekindling of desire. Poppy also realises that since they were last together, the Matthew she thought she knew so well has changed.

This is a competently put together thriller but I struggled to engage with the plot progression or to empathise with Poppy’s singular mission. Clues are dropped in plain site and not pursued with the determination she grants nebulous suspicions. Her mother is struggling yet Poppy appears largely unsupportive, concentrating on what happened to the sister she had not been in touch with for many years.

An enjoyable enough tale but not one that resonated with me as it has for others. With the work required to create, it is a shame that we cannot adore every book we read.

My copy of this book was provided gratis by the publisher.

This post is a stop on The Other Twin Blog Tour. Do check out the other blogs taking part, detailed below.

The Other Twin is published by Orenda Books.

Book Review: The Stolen Child

The Stolen Child, by Sanjida Kay, is the author’s second psychological thriller. Much as I enjoyed her first, Bone by Bone (which I review here), in this latest work she has upped her game. An underlying darkness pervades every page. I needed to know what happened next but at times had to pause, so acute was the tension.

The protagonist is Zoe Morley, an artist and mother of two. Seven year old Evie was adopted as a baby; two year old Ben was a delightful surprise for a couple who had given up hope of birthing a healthy child themselves. Zoe’s husband, Ollie, is a hard working accountant. The long hours he puts in at the office in order to provide for his family are resented by Zoe who struggles with the demands of parenting alongside her desire to further her artistic career. She feels that Ollie does not take her work seriously as it yields little additional income for the family’s material needs.

When Zoe discovers that Evie has received cards and presents from someone claiming to be her real daddy she is concerned and aggrieved that Ollie will not offer her the comfort and support she craves. He is angry but does not share her feelings that their position in their daughter’s life is threatened.

Zoe’s attention is fragmented between her work, a demanding toddler, and a daughter who is starting to question her place in their family unit. Zoe is also dealing with the distraction of another artist, a sculptor named Harris, who pays her flattering attention and supports her work.

In the small town where they live Zoe has plenty of options for childcare. Evie and Ben are regularly looked after by professionals, friends and babysitters, giving Zoe time to walk the moors for inspiration and then to paint. She trusts these people with her children, until her world is turned upside down and inside out when Evie disappears. Suddenly everyone she knows, including Ollie, is under suspicion.

As the police investigate, personal secrets threaten to derail trusted relationships. Zoe’s devastation at her loss is compounded by feelings of guilt and anger at her husband for not being more present. As days pass and progress appears to stall in the search for her daughter, she takes matters into her own hands.

The writing is taut and visceral. I did not warm to Zoe but empathised fully with her pain. The events related tear many lives apart, not least the children’s. Trust is shown to be such a fragile thing.

This is an emotive and disturbing tale presented with compassion and skill. A thriller with soul and depth that I recommend you read.

My copy of this book was provided gratis by the publisher, Corvus.