Faith, religion and bigotry: Part 4

Easter Sunday is a day of joyful celebration for Christians around the world. On this day we remember that our God defeated his enemies with love. For all those who ask for proof that God exists we can point to Jesus. Here was a man who could turn water into wine, heal the sick with a touch and raise the dead. Ordinary people heard him speak, saw what he could do and followed him in their thousands. The leaders of the church and state were angry at his popularity and terrified of his power. They had him put to death as a criminal but he rose from the dead. He defeated all of his enemies without harming any of them. He harmed their power and their wealth so they tried to stop him. They failed.

I am sometimes asked how I know that God exists. Do my questioners wish me to perform a miracle? If I were to heal a sick person then they would claim that it would have happened anyway. They would look for a scientific quirk or claim that the person had not really been sick. If I were to generate some wonder such as turning water into wine then they would claim I was doing some clever magic trick. If a person is determined not to believe in God then this sort of performance will not convince them. I would not be able to prove to them that God exists no matter what I did; they would always find some reason or excuse why the outcome had not been enabled by God.

Faith is defined as a complete trust or confidence in someone or something. When I was growing up and started to ask questions about God and biblical teaching, much of my confusion centred around the difficulty of trying to prove facts. How could I know that the answer I was being given was correct when so many of the premises seemed hazy and disputed? I was told to look to the bible and found contradictions. I was told that this was due to the way the book had been written so long ago, put together by a committee, interpreted over time and eventually translated from the ancient language in which it was written. Given all of this, it is no wonder that some of it can be a bit tricky to understand.

I now read the bible as a guide book rather than a rule book. It provides historical context and accounts of lives that we can learn from. It also provides beautiful poetry and stories. It is a valuable resource and should be used to offer help and comfort. I do not like to see it used as a reason to condemn people; I do not believe that we have any right to judge others. If a person chooses to follow God then Christians should welcome them as Jesus did. If a person chooses not to follow God then they should be free to make that choice.

Some of my atheist friends cannot see how I can be a Christian and still love science. This is my explanation of how I see things. When I look around at the cosmos I see order. The interrelationships between the largest galaxies, their solar systems and planets is awesome. On earth we have the sun and moon affecting the life cycle of every living being and every living being affecting all others. From the largest predators to the smallest micro organisms, all have an important role to play in maintaining the balance of life. When something is damaged, be it a forest burnt down or a child cutting their knee in a fall, nature will try to heal itself if left alone.

I do not believe that this perfect order is a coincidence. I believe that, if the world we live in was initially created by a big bang, then God made that happen. In the most simple terms, I see God as a scientist and his creation is so vast and amazing that I am not capable of understanding it all. There are a great many things that I do not understand but accept; particle physics sounds fascinating but I have never really grasped it fully. Me being able to understand, explain and prove something is not necessary for that thing to exist.

God has done many things in my life, personal things, that have proved to me that he exists. He has healed a sick child when the medical experts told the parents that there was no hope. He has spoken to me when I have talked to him. Just as a young child will feel more comfortable and confident performing on a scary stage knowing that their parent is sitting, unseen in the audience willing them to do well, so God watches over my life. If I go to a party with my husband I do not need to hold on to him throughout the event to know that he is there. If I need him then I know that I can turn to him for support. Thus it is with God.

To those who seem hell bent on removing a belief in God from the world because of the harm that men acting spuriously in his name have wreaked I would ask them to consider the comfort that God offers those who believe in him, who aim to live in love as Jesus taught them. Why would the atheists wish to remove such an important element of someone’s life just because they disagree with the premises of the faith? We should not be afraid of something just because we do not understand it and we should not ridicule or condemn others just because we disagree with their beliefs.

I will try very hard not to judge, to be tolerant of disparate views and accepting of others choices. I will try to live my life showing love to myself and to others. I wish you all a very Happy Easter.

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Faith, religion and bigotry: Part 3

Throughout my life I seem to have had a penchant for doing things just a little bit differently to the norm. Although my primary degree was in Computer Science I took this subject through the Arts Faculty at my university to enable me to take Philosophy alongside. I cannot begin to say how much I enjoyed studying Philosophy. Had I not been determined to gain a qualification that would lead to a well paid job then this would have been my subject of choice. I read the texts for pleasure, could write my assignments without effort and gained good marks without trying. The subject taught me that absolutes are rare in arguments and that any opinion can be made to appear reasonable if presented in a certain way. It laid the foundations of my distrust of politicians and the media.

Throughout history the established church has been used to manipulate people’s behaviour by those in power. It is generally recognised that power and money corrupt those who wield them and the church has always enjoyed both. The hierarchies of the establishment have attracted the ruthlessly ambitious and fear has been used to secure the longevity of the institutions as moral blackmail and social condemnation have been preached and imposed. It has suited the political classes to make use of the established church to shape the behaviour of the general population. The power plays between church and state have continually resulted in bloodshed through the ages.

Alongside this though, much good has also been done. Convents and Monasteries provided employment, education and medical care for those in their vicinity. Food would be handed out to the starving and safe shelter offered to the wives and daughters of the wealthy when their protectors travelled. Although the inhabitants of these institutions may have been placed there by their families as an astute offering to the powerful church and to avoid a costly and possibly unsatisfactory apprenticeship or marriage, the work that they did often benefited both the local and wider community.

There have also always been some individuals who have entered the church with an untainted vocation. Innumerable, small, breakaway denominations have been established by those who despaired of the corruption that abounded and felt called by God to offer an alternative. Others have successfully worked within the establishment to serve rather than master their congregations. These individuals teach and preach a loving faith rather than a fearful obligation.

The bloody history of the church provides it’s detractors with ample examples of atrocities. These continue through to modern times and are not confined to the Christian denominations. Quotes from holy books are used to excuse maiming and murder; wars are started in the name of a god; women are subjugated and punished for thinking for themselves; none of this is done in the spirit of love but in the pursuit of power. A set of rules is imposed, loosely based on a particular interpretation of a few verses from an approved text; skilled orators draw support from those who fear change or hanker for a time that favoured them. God’s name is taken in vain by so many who ¬†claim to serve him by feeding prejudice and a compromised morality.

The stories of Jesus talk of him dining with those that the church of his time condemned. He took as his friends a motley crew of misfits, miscreants and social rejects. He spent his time helping those who were sick, hungry, condemned and rejected by society. He told his followers to love themselves and each other. The established church has always sought to complicate this simple message and impose it’s own set of rules for it’s own gain.

I don’t know a great deal about the other major religions but my understanding is that they have suffered similar manipulations. At their heart their holy books seem to offer sensible advice for living a good life. Their leaders have then taken these and interpreted aspects to suit their own agendas. I suspect that the fanatics and extremists are following their leaders rather than the gist of the teachings of their God.

Church membership offers a great deal of comfort and support to many people and, despite my criticisms of the way it is run, I would not advocate it’s demise. I despise the hypocrisy of those who preach division, condemnation and hate in the name of a loving God; who use the wealth and power of their position to further their own prejudiced views. However, much good is still done by the many individuals who benefit from the support and guidance offered by the church as they go about their everyday lives. When helping others is at the heart of the work that a church performs it can still be a force for good in our troubled world.

Jesus did not compel anyone to follow him. He explained his ideas and invited any who wished to join him to do so. There was no coercion, no threat or ridicule for those who chose to walk away. I have noticed in recent times that a number of friends of mine who have embraced atheism will talk of religious believers in a way that puts them down as deluded and foolish. These people seem to be going the way of the religious bigots, attempting to force their point of view on others.

I know that my God exists but I feel no need to prove it to others. I will explain my reasons if asked, but believe that each of us should have the freedom to decide for ourselves. Trying to use force or ridicule suggests a desperation to have others agree with a particular point of view, perhaps to validate or perpetuate it. My God is all powerful and all knowing; he will exist with or without popular support and needs no help from me.

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