Book Review: Dreamy Days and Random Naps

Dreamy Days and Random Naps is the third picture book for adults (although smaller people are also likely to enjoy the daily dilemmas they explore) published by Mawson, a writer bear who lives with his guardian and many furry friends in Perth, Australia. While Mawson sits quietly pondering the complexities of being, his friends: go travelling, play music, dream of heroic deeds, build inventions such as a Hope-Maker. All come to Mawson to share what they have been doing, seeking his wisdom when worries occur.

One thing all the bears understand is the importance of regular naps.

Mawson has wisdom to share in this, an area of particular expertise.

 

The bears nap and dream, dream and nap. They are not afraid to follow when dreams beckon. The travellers go out and then return. The inventors test their creations. Outcomes are not always what was envisaged.

Mawson understands that dreams can be important, offering hope and the chance to make life a little better.

He also understands the importance of not focusing too much on what might have been, or will be in the future, when there is so much to appreciate in the here and now.

There is a hint of melancholy in many of the bears’ ponders – a desire to be something just beyond what is possible. Mawson provides a fine reminder that what we all have – the ability to be in the moment – can be enough if recognised and permitted by each self.

Mawson’s true strength is in being there for his friends, to listen and support whatever their endeavours. Readers can take comfort in his ponders, and maybe strive to be a little more like Mawson themselves.

This is a delightful addition to a series that offers advice sprinkled with gentle humour. The pictures help bring the bears to life.

My copy of this book was provided gratis by the author.


Across the globe in Wiltshire, my bears benefit from Mawson’s wise words.

Book Review: She Ran Away From Love

Mawson is a writer bear whose guardian helps him put his ponders into books, thereby helping other baffled beings navigate their lives. I reviewed his debut here.

In this, his second publication, Mawson tells the story of his good friend, Frilly, a small bear with a predilection for all things pink who goes on a brave quest to find herself. Frilly was frightened and ran away when love shone too brightly on her. She seeks happiness but isn’t sure where to look for it after love proved so scary.

The tale opens with Frilly consulting Mawson and asking some big questions. Frilly wants to be different, less afraid, so decides to boldly go out into the world and find the bear she wants to be.

Only a little bit daunted by obstacles along the way, she at last finds a place where she may be whatever she chooses. This doesn’t offer the satisfaction expected. Frilly returns home saddened and confused.

She asks Mawson how she can ever find happiness. After consulting his many books, Mawson has the answer, yet Frilly still feels sad. Some answers require a little more personal tailoring to be effective. They require effort and reaction.

Mawson doesn’t give up. He knows that Frilly must find her own way to address how she is feeling, but he has helpful suggestions as to things she might try. Between them they manage to work out what Frilly can do to cope with times that prove difficult. In better understanding what happiness is, Frilly is able to move forward and be more like the bear she aspires to be.

The joy of these books is their gentle approach to universal dilemmas. Mawson may not be a typical guru but he cares and has time for his friends. He understands the importance of a hug. He can sit quietly and listen, offering advice but only if requested. He shows no resentment when friends choose to leave him behind, even when staying at home may appear the safer option.

There is humour as well as wisdom in these pages. Readers, whatever their age, can empathise with a small bear whose life has its shadows that will at times make navigation a challenge.

Life advice from bears that is on point but never didactic. What’s not to love?

My copy of this book was provided gratis by the author.

 

 


Mawson’s latest book being enjoyed by one of my small bears

Book Review: It’s A Bright World To Feel Lost In

Today I review a book that is a little different to my normal fare. Sent to me all the way from Australia, although available to buy in the UK, It’s A Bright World To Feel Lost In is a 50 page picture book suitable for anyone who sometimes feels confused and lonely in our beautiful world.

Narrated by a sleuth of teddy bears, led by the fluffy author, Mawson, it ponders how one’s importance to a special Some One can change over time. It accepts the pain of loss, makes suggestions about how to cope, and offers hope for future happiness.

The opening premise is that everyone wants to be loved and to have their love appreciated. There is still so much love on offer in our big, bright world.

The problem can be finding that special Some One when the world is so big. We can be primed and ready to give but still have to wait, and time passes slowly when waiting.

The bears remember days of fun and adventure when they explored and played with their Some One, before that Some One chose to go out into the wider world without them.

They ponder how hard it is to keep playing the games that had been such fun, and the difficulty of caring for a Some One who isn’t there.

The bears do their best to occupy themselves but life is so much better when their Some One returns.

The story explores the possibility that one day this won’t happen, that their Some One will be gone, and life must still go on.

The context, of course, is wider than a lonely teddy bear. The story progression offers a reminder to make the most of Some One’s company, be they family, friend or partner, to enjoy each day for what it is. Mawson and his furry friends appreciate the happy days and are perplexed when they end.

If Some One goes, although it will hurt, there is the possibility of one day being found by Some One else. Until that time there are games to be played, even if they aren’t quite as enjoyable as before.

The book could offer solace for anyone in need of company for their adventures, a child who has been let down or an adult who has been left behind or lost a loved one.

The reasons for change may be baffling, but ultimately there is hope.

I admit that I have a soft spot for teddy bears. This little story made me well up, made me want to hug every one of the bears in my (ahem) extensive collection. It also made me appreciate the humans who join me on my adventures. It is a lovely, poignant story with delightful illustrations. It would make a thoughtful gift, including for yourself.

My copy of this book was provided gratis by the furry author’s Some One.

My own little bears enjoyed reading it too.